42nd Dayton-Cincinnati
Aerospace Sciences Symposium

List of Art in Science Entries

Art in science entries will be listed here as they are submitted and approved by the art in science chairs.

 Entry: 42DCASS-103 
 Entry Type: video
preview

Interaction between a liquid drop and a Mach number 1.7 shock wave

Yongsheng Lian (yongsheng.lian@louisville.edu)
University of Louisville

Density contours of the simulated interaction between a water drop and a Mach 1.7 shock wave.



 Entry: 42DCASS-104 
 Entry Type: video
preview

Simulation of impact of two water droplet on a wet surface using the moment of fluid method.

Yongsheng Lian (yongsheng.lian@louisville.edu)
University of Louisville

Drop diameter is 200 micrometers and impact speed is 15 m/s and impingement angle is 45 degrees.



 Entry: 42DCASS-151 
 Entry Type: image
preview

Earth in Summer

Melissa Dunkel (melissa.dunkel@afit.edu)
Air Force Institute of Technology

This is a graph of temperature data, a representation used to validate the atmospheric model used by the boost-glide optimization sequence.



 Entry: 42DCASS-209 
 Entry Type: image
preview

Hencken Burner Flame Terrain

Marc Polanka (marc.polanka@afit.edu)
Air Force Institute of Technology
Brian T. Bohan
Air Force Institute of Technology

This photo is of the flame from a Hencken Burner. An edge finding filter was applied to isolate flames and enhance the contours created by velocity variations of gases exiting the device.



 Entry: 42DCASS-187 
 Entry Type: video
preview

Eyes of Ouroboros

William Stoddard (stoddawa@mail.uc.edu)
University of Cincinnati

As the serpentine rotating detonation wave eats its own tail, the water concentration isosurface marks the boundary between the consumed and unconsumed hydrogen.



 Entry: 42DCASS-200 
 Entry Type: image
preview

Artemis & Apollo

Chirau Patel (patelcj@mail.uc.edu)
University of Cincinnati
Justas Jodele
University of Cincinnati
Chase Hartman
University of Cincinnati
Gaurav Patel
University of Cincinnati

"Payload and Launch Vehicle Descent from University of Cincinnati Spacecraft Senior Design Team: Baerocats-December 10, 2016"



 Entry: 42DCASS-201 
 Entry Type: image
preview

Eternally Vigilant

Arthur Huber (afhuber@bellsouth.net)
Air Force Research Laboratory
Art Huber
Air Force Research Laboratory

This photo was taken on a flightline at an undisclosed location in the Middle East. It is science and technology that enabled the conception, design, and development of the F-16 of which over 4,500 have been built and which has found service in over two dozen countries. The F-16 provides an unmatched combination of capability, affordability, compatibility, and reliability. It has introduced to the world many new technologies from fly-by-wire flight controls to, most recently, automatic ground collision avoidance. As a 4th-generation fighter, some might argue that the sun is setting on this historic aircraft, but the beauty of this scene reminds those who know better that the F-16 will be around for many years to come and in many ways the sun is rising for those to whom it gives continued hope for a secure future.



 Entry: 42DCASS-202 
 Entry Type: video
preview

Wall Temperature Contours of HIFiRE-6

Nicholas Bisek (Nicholas.Bisek.1@us.af.mil)
Air Force Research Laboratory

High fidelity Large Eddy Simulations were carried out for the HIFiRE-6 flight vehicle at full vehicle-scale and Mach 6 cruise conditions. The movie shows unsteady surface temperature contours through the isolator section of the vehicle. Due to its circular cross-section, a conical shock train develops as the flow is compressed. The unsteady complex flow field predicts regions where hot gases are trapped near the isolator surface due to the conical shock boundary layer interaction.



 Entry: 42DCASS-203 
 Entry Type: image
preview

Island Chains in a Sea of Chaos

John Brick (john.brick@afit.edu)
Air Force Institute of Technology
Christopher D. Geisel
Air Force Institute of Technology

A periapsis Poincaré map generated in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem at a value of the Jacobi Constant equal to 3.15. 1,468 spacecraft trajectories are numerically integrated for 11.9 years using a supercomputer. The island structures are associated with periapses of quasiperiodic trajectories, while the dusted sea is associated with periapses of chaotic trajectories.



 Entry: 42DCASS-204 
 Entry Type: video
preview

Oscillatory Breakup of Liquid Droplets

Prashant Khare (Prashant.Khare@uc.edu)
University of Cincinnati

The video shows the oscillatory breakup of a water droplet that is moving in quiescent air environment at 100 atm pressure and room temperature conditions. The diameter and velocity of the droplet are 100 microns and 12 m/s, respectively. The corresponding Weber number is 24.



 Entry: 42DCASS-205 
 Entry Type: video
preview

Bag Breakup of Liquid Droplets

Prashant Khare (Prashant.Khare@uc.edu)
University of Cincinnati

The video shows the fragmentation of a water droplet that is moving in quiescent air (P = 100 atm, T = 298 K) via the bag breakup mechanism. The diameter and velocity of the droplet are 50 microns and 20 m/s, respectively. The corresponding Weber number is 33.



 Entry: 42DCASS-206 
 Entry Type: image
preview

Escape the Sphere

Helmut Koch (helmut.koch@uky.edu)
University of Kentucky
Michael W. Winter
University of Kentucky

This picture was taken during an experiment with the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Plasma Generator at the University of Kentucky. It shows an ion beam leaving the central space charge within the inner spherical electrode through its largest gap.



 Entry: 42DCASS-207 
 Entry Type: video
preview

In-depth Charring Ablator Numerical Simulation of Pyrolysis Gas Momentum Flow

Justin Cooper (Justin.Cooper@uky.edu)
University of Kentucky
Haoyue Weng and Alexandre Martin
University of Kentucky

Video demonstrates the moving pyrolysis decomposition zone shown in the green region and the velocity stream traces of the evolved pyrolysis gas that cool ablators used on spacecraft.



 Entry: 42DCASS-208 
 Entry Type: video
preview

Cork Blowtorch Experiment

James Sparks (devin.sparks@uky.edu)
University of Kentucky
Evan C. Whitmer, Gabriel I. Myers, Courtney C. Montague, Suzanne W. Smith, Alexandre Martin
University of Kentucky

This video shows how cork can withstand extreme heat. The heat was applied for more than 2 minutes. This is important to the project since cork is being used as the Thermal Protection System for the atmospheric re-entry capsule.