Art-in-Science

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This content is associated with the DCASS Art-in-Science competition.

Break Out The Guns!

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This image depicts operation of a 9-stick Gatling-Gun micro PPT thruster firing. Sticks fire seqentially from 1 to 9, but long expose setting captures all 9 firing in brilliant detail.

Alien On the Tip of a Plasma Torch Cathode Tip?

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Various structures (and perhaps even an alien) can be seen in the ~600 micrometer diameter crater formed on the tip of a plasma torch igniter cathode. The structures were formed as the melted tungsten at the tip solidified while cooling from temperatures in excess of 6600°F.

A Naturally Micro Flyer

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This prototype flapping wing micro air vehicle is the first of its kind, because of its ability to flap each wing independently. This vehicle, designed and built by the artists, was used to test flight control algorithms for hovering flight. Fabricated from advanced composite materials, it has a wing span of 8 centimeters, weighs less than a gram and is powered by piezo-electric crystal actuators.

What Did One Metroid Say To the Other?

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This image was created during some work with Laser Peening (LP) simulations to determine the critical distance between two LP shots. Metroids were the jellyfish-like monsters from a Nintendo video game from the 80's. The mesh from the FEA really gives it that 8-bit retro game feel. Based on their colors in the image, these two Metroids looks as though they may be ready to attack!

Hough Transform

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The Hough (pronounced "huff") transform is used to identify lines in digital images. Here, a black-to-white colormap portrays increasing support for lines in a digital image taken with a camera aboard a small, indoor, hovering air vehicle. Information from the camera can be combined with inertial data to produce a long-term stable estimate of vehicle attitude.

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